Hi wheres the cherryblossom tree in the classroom thing from? sorry I couldnt find it in the tags, thanks in advance^^'

best-of-memes:

Okay , so a lot of people asked me questions about this so I am going to write an article about it and answer all of them in one post :

In suffering from the earthquake in Japan, here was a very interesting tradition called Okurie. This tradition, to be more precise, is an art project. It concerns those houses that are being demolished, people decorate them with graffiti and murals that at least for a short time will give them a nice festive look.And one of these actions was organized by the artist Yosuke Tan. He invited to participate in this action everyone who could come , so that all could participate in the process of painting the college building, where he once studied  himself.

It took 27 liters of paint, people painted the old building with their hands, which eventually developed into an amazing picture . The building is transformed, becomes festive, and has an elegant appearance, but at the same time, it’s a bit sad, because the flowers are brought not just for the holidays, but also for the funeral …

And that is how several hundred cherry blossoms appeared on the windows, doors and walls of the building. 

by Anonymous
therealbohemian:

Home Café / Penda

therealbohemian:

Home Café / Penda

youngblackandvegan:

queendecuisine:

1863-project:

tigertwo1515:

did-you-kno:

Source

Damn

OKAY, LET’S TALK ABOUT ROBERT SMALLS (BECAUSE HE HAS A NAME, THANK YOU VERY MUCH).
ANYWAY.
Robert Smalls was born into slavery in 1839 and at the age of 12 his owner leased him out in Charleston, South Carolina. He gravitated towards working at the docks and on boats and eventually became the equivalent of a pilot, and in late 1861 he found himself assigned to a military transport boat named the CSS Planter.
On May 12, 1862, the white officers decided to spend the night on land. Smalls rounded up the enslaved crew and they hatched a plan, and once the officers were long gone they made a run for it, only stopping to pick up their families (who they notified) along the way. Smalls, disguised as the captain, steered the boat past Confederate forts (including Ft. Sumter) and over to the Union blockade, raising a white sheet his wife took from her job as a hotel maid as a flag of truce. The CSS Planter had a highly valuable code book and all manner of explosives on board.
Smalls ended up serving in the Union Navy and rose to the rank of captain there. He was also one of a number of individuals who talked to Abraham Lincoln about the possibility of African-American soldiers fighting for the Union, which became a reality.
After the war, Smalls bought his owner’s old plantation in Beaufort and even allowed the owner’s sickly wife to move back in until her death. He eventually served in the South Carolina House of Representatives (1865-1870), the South Carolina Senate (1871-1874), and the United States House of Representatives (1875-1879) and represented South Carolina’s 5th District from 1882-1883 and the 7th District from 1884-1887. He and other black politicians also fought against an amendment designed to disenfranchise black voters in 1895, but it unfortunately passed.
Smalls ended his public life by serving as U.S. Collector of Customs in Beaufort from 1889-1911. He died in 1915 at the age of 75.
And now you know Robert Smalls.

ROBERT SMALLS IS THE MAN.

can we get a movie about this man?

youngblackandvegan:

queendecuisine:

1863-project:

tigertwo1515:

did-you-kno:

Source

Damn


OKAY, LET’S TALK ABOUT ROBERT SMALLS (BECAUSE HE HAS A NAME, THANK YOU VERY MUCH).

ANYWAY.

Robert Smalls was born into slavery in 1839 and at the age of 12 his owner leased him out in Charleston, South Carolina. He gravitated towards working at the docks and on boats and eventually became the equivalent of a pilot, and in late 1861 he found himself assigned to a military transport boat named the CSS Planter.

On May 12, 1862, the white officers decided to spend the night on land. Smalls rounded up the enslaved crew and they hatched a plan, and once the officers were long gone they made a run for it, only stopping to pick up their families (who they notified) along the way. Smalls, disguised as the captain, steered the boat past Confederate forts (including Ft. Sumter) and over to the Union blockade, raising a white sheet his wife took from her job as a hotel maid as a flag of truce. The CSS Planter had a highly valuable code book and all manner of explosives on board.

Smalls ended up serving in the Union Navy and rose to the rank of captain there. He was also one of a number of individuals who talked to Abraham Lincoln about the possibility of African-American soldiers fighting for the Union, which became a reality.

After the war, Smalls bought his owner’s old plantation in Beaufort and even allowed the owner’s sickly wife to move back in until her death. He eventually served in the South Carolina House of Representatives (1865-1870), the South Carolina Senate (1871-1874), and the United States House of Representatives (1875-1879) and represented South Carolina’s 5th District from 1882-1883 and the 7th District from 1884-1887. He and other black politicians also fought against an amendment designed to disenfranchise black voters in 1895, but it unfortunately passed.

Smalls ended his public life by serving as U.S. Collector of Customs in Beaufort from 1889-1911. He died in 1915 at the age of 75.

And now you know Robert Smalls.

ROBERT SMALLS IS THE MAN.

can we get a movie about this man?

(via gasshofriend)

manvmiles:

Five weeks to go until the Berlin Marathon and it’s time to get back to the track for some of that lovely speed work.

I’m armed with a few new warm up drills thanks to the session I had the other day with Fit.as.

So it’s a round of marching high knees, ankling and and high knee jumps followed by this:

14 x 200m @ 38 with 200m jog between reps. In the rain.

manvmiles:

Somewhere out there in all that reason is the track. But when you gotta train, you gotta train. 

No excuses. 

Brightside: You can only get wet once.

manvmiles:

Somewhere out there in all that reason is the track. But when you gotta train, you gotta train.

No excuses.

Brightside: You can only get wet once.

archatlas:

In the Beginning Bohnchang Koo
Zoom Info
archatlas:

In the Beginning Bohnchang Koo
Zoom Info
archatlas:

In the Beginning Bohnchang Koo
Zoom Info
archatlas:

In the Beginning Bohnchang Koo
Zoom Info
archatlas:

In the Beginning Bohnchang Koo
Zoom Info
archatlas:

In the Beginning Bohnchang Koo
Zoom Info
archatlas:

In the Beginning Bohnchang Koo
Zoom Info

archatlas:

In the Beginning Bohnchang Koo

memeguy-com:

It kills me to say this but its true

memeguy-com:

It kills me to say this but its true

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